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gjmueller:

Intelligent people are more likely to trust others

Intelligent people are more likely to trust others, while those who score lower on measures of intelligence are less likely to do so, says a new study. Oxford University researchers based their finding on an analysis of the General Social Survey, a nationally representative public opinion survey carried out in the United States every one to two years. The authors say one explanation could be that more intelligent individuals are better at judging character and so they tend to form relationships with people who are less likely to betray them. Another reason could be that smarter individuals are better at weighing up situations, recognizing when there is a strong incentive for the other person not to meet their side of the deal.The study, published in the journal, PLOS ONE, supports previous research that analyzed data on trust and intelligence from European countries. The authors say the research is significant because social trust contributes to the success of important social institutions, such as welfare systems and financial markets. In addition, research shows that individuals who trust others report better health and greater happiness.

image via flickr:CC | jmennens

gjmueller:

Intelligent people are more likely to trust others

Intelligent people are more likely to trust others, while those who score lower on measures of intelligence are less likely to do so, says a new study. Oxford University researchers based their finding on an analysis of the General Social Survey, a nationally representative public opinion survey carried out in the United States every one to two years. The authors say one explanation could be that more intelligent individuals are better at judging character and so they tend to form relationships with people who are less likely to betray them. Another reason could be that smarter individuals are better at weighing up situations, recognizing when there is a strong incentive for the other person not to meet their side of the deal.

The study, published in the journal, PLOS ONE, supports previous research that analyzed data on trust and intelligence from European countries. The authors say the research is significant because social trust contributes to the success of important social institutions, such as welfare systems and financial markets. In addition, research shows that individuals who trust others report better health and greater happiness.

image via flickr:CC | jmennens

rodenn:

RT Meme » [02/03] Things

Joe the Cat || Innovator, genius, a creative light for our time, I have been called none of these things, for I am just a retired cat.

danmeth:

HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY!
Here’s a collection of drawings that have nothing to do with St. Patrick’s Day other than the fact that they’re green!

theyuniversity:

image

Hello, Anon.

It’s actually the “-pathy" words. ("Patheia" is Greek for feeling or suffering.)

Because there are numerous words that include the “-pathy" root, I’ll just go over the most common ones:

1. Antipathy: deep-seated hatred of something or someone.

Jim’s antipathy

gjmueller:

buzzfeed inspires:

Thanks Bob, you always know what to say. 

Because Mommy is forever.
It’s such a powerful name. Mommy means “I trust you.” Mommy means “you will protect me.” Mommy is for shouting when you need someone dependable and for laughing with when you are excited; Mommy is for crying on and cuddling with when you are sad or giggling and hiding behind when you are embarrassed. Mommy is the fixer of boo-boos and the mender of broken hearts. Mommy is a comfort place, a safe place. Mommy means you are mine and I am yours and we are family.

Katie Davis (via jessirynn)

____________________________________________________

my daughter has recently started calling me “mommy” after calling me “mama” her whole little life, and it’s sooooo cute and i just melt and do whatever she wants lol

(via snow-to-water)
theparisreview:

“What the best fantasy does—and what Le Guin does in spades—is give the impression that even when the book stops, the world inside its pages continues to exist beyond the bounds of the author’s invention.”
Read more of this week’s staff picks, including Ursula Le Guin’s Tales from Earthsea, Blek le Rat’s solo exhibition Ignorance is Bliss, and Lizzie Skurnick Books.

theparisreview:

“What the best fantasy does—and what Le Guin does in spades—is give the impression that even when the book stops, the world inside its pages continues to exist beyond the bounds of the author’s invention.”

Read more of this week’s staff picks, including Ursula Le Guin’s Tales from Earthsea, Blek le Rat’s solo exhibition Ignorance is Bliss, and Lizzie Skurnick Books.

sabrinanymph:

novemberhour:

bruxcat:

More pics -including a crochet Tardis- at "Crafty is Cool".

THEIR EXPRESSIONS ARE REMARKABLE

These are perfect.